Pro Studio – Week of 11/28

Pro Studio – Latin meaning “For Study”

Where Has Critical Appreciation Gone? – “The death of John Stott has led to a veritable flood of accolades and uncritical adulation over the last few months. A recent example was the memorial service for him at Wheaton College which raised a number of questions in my mind. One was the issue of what Stott himself would have thought of it.”

Christians and Alcohol – “The relationship of Christians to alcohol is one of those perennial issues. It has often been the source of heated disagreement and even separation. It is a particularly important topic in the United States, but, since much of the rest of the world is culturally downstream from the U.S., it affects every Christian to some degree.”

Q&A With Horton: Politics – “What is the relationship between Christianity and politics? What danger comes from confusing the two?” See also, Ancient Israel’s Government Today? and Faith and Voting.

What the Tolerant Must Tolerate – “To be a serious Christian in modern Western culture is to be the favoured easy target of every progressive thinker and every half-witted comedian. It is to have your sensibilities and your deepest beliefs on perpetual call for taunts, mockery and desecration. At a time when all progressives preach full volume for inclusivity and sensitivity, for the utmost care in speech when speaking of others with differing views or hues, Christians, as Christians, are under a constant hail of abuse and disregard. There is nothing too low or too vulgar.”

Character Does Not End at the Bedroom Door – “We do not yet know if Herman Cain had the affair with which he is charged. We do know, however, that the argument put forth by his attorney is shameful. When charges like these are made, a candidate cannot hide behind the bedroom door.”

How to Shrink Your Church – “So, God save us from the successful church.”

Why Catechism: Theological Laziness

It seems that there are few other pursuits that require such a little working knowledge than that of Christianity.

– Paul Watson –

Introduction

I have quoted my friend Paul Watson before, but I believe that the accuracy of his statement is poignant and worth repeating until it awakens the senses that the church has a real problem on its hands. Perhaps this quote was further engrained into my memory a couple of Sundays ago as I was commissioned to preach and teach at a church in south-eastern Kansas. As I concluded the sermon, on the Superiority of the Priesthood of Christ, the reaction of the audience was everything but enthusiastic and thankfulness to God. The congregation seemed completely disengaged and unaffected by the joy and blessing of having our salvation secured in the eternal priesthood of Christ as preached in Hebrews 5-10. Unfortunately the attitude did not stop at the end of the service. As I began the college sunday school class, we started with the first question of the Heidelberg Catechism which asks, “What is your only comfort in life and death?” As I started to work through the answer, evaluating each line and asking why each phrase was a comfort in life and death, I was met with an obstinate attitude and the question, “Why are you making us think?” Surprisingly this is not the only time I have encountered this question in the church or even in a college setting where thinking is your occupation for 2-4 years.

What follows in this post in strictly an evaluation of the current problem. In order to learn my proposed solution to this problem, you will have to wait for the following 3 posts. For, in order to understand the significance of a change in tactic, we must understand the position in which we currently stand. Please understand, the position in which we currently sit is by no means a pleasant one to deal with, but believe me when I say that there is hope and that it is completely within the means of the church.

Theological Laziness

It is evident that the level of biblical knowledge or theological clarity in the church is poor at best. However, it is not absent, which is a silver line in this otherwise gloomy cloud. But what is meant by theological laziness? By the use of this term I wish to communicate that the lack of biblical literacy in regard to the individual is not due to a lack of resources, for certainly we have an abundance of biblical/theological resources available to us in America. However, there is a growing trend of aliterate congregants in the church. That is to say, they have the tools and resources available to them to learn and grow, yet they willingly choose to not use them.

For an illustration of this point it is beneficial to pull from the experience of Dietrich Bonhoeffer when he attended Union Theological Seminary in 1930. It is telling that the experience had by him there is not all that different from our current position in the church. Upon observing the students there, he once wrote to a friend:

There is no theology here…they talk a blue streak without the slightest substantive foundation and with no evidence of any criteria. The students – on the average twenty-five to thirty years old – are completely clueless with respect to what dogmatics is really about. They are unfamiliar with even the most basic questions. They become intoxicated with liberal and humanistic phrases, laugh at the fundamentalists, and yet basically are not even up to their level. (Eric Metaxas, Bonhoeffer, 101)

This is the first aspect to the term “Theological Laziness”. The second aspect is what some have coined as ‘Parroting’. This is stated to denote those individuals who only quote and repeat books, systematic theologies, or the ‘right’ preacher and theologians. Rather than being fluent in the Scriptures, developing theological convictions from that, and using Scripture as the basis for checking theological systems, they rely on what certain individuals have said. While this may mean that they have a large understanding of theology, they are not much better off than those who choose not to learn because they fail to base their theological convictions on Scripture. (This is not to deny the value of Theologies and books however.) Further, the person has not spent time wrestling with Scripture and relying on the Holy Spirit to illuminate their understanding of Scripture. Again, Dietrich Bonhoeffer’s words are beneficial in this regard as well.

Not only quietness is lacking, but also the characteristic impulse towards the development of individual thought which is brought about in German universities by the more secluded life of the individuals. Thus there is little intellectual competition and little intellectual ambition. This gives work in seminar lecture or discussion a very innocuous character. It is more a friendly exchange of opinion that a study in comprehension. (Ibid., 104)

In case the individual plight is not sorrowful enough, the situation in the church is not much better. Preaching in the church tends to be shallow, application driven speeches rather than preaching Christ and Him crucified every Sunday. Further, hearing deep theology from the pulpit is a rarity these days. In the 1920’s and 30’s the church was hit with a wave of ethics and sociological centered preaching where the sermon was replaced with a message responding to the news paper and the ‘fundamentalists’. (Thank you Harry Emerson Fosdick). Further, due to the liberal emphasis in the church that arose, the Bible was subject to malicious attacks under ‘higher criticism’ that sought to discredit much of what Scripture tought on life and salvation. With this assault from the pulpit, many congregants forgot catechism or theological instruction and the emphasis on applicatory sermons was driven to such a degree that J. Gresham Machen stated there was no Christianity left to apply. Since that time, true Gospel preaching, preaching Christ and Him crucified has become rare or absent. Again Dietrich Bonhoeffer encountered this.

Things are not much different in the church. The sermon has been reduced to parenthetical church remarks about newspaper events. As long as I’ve been here, I have heard only one sermon in which you could hear something like a genuine proclamation, and that was delivered by a negro (indeed, in generally I’m increasingly discovering greater religious power and originality in Negroes). One big question continually attracting my attention in view of these facts is whether one here really can still speak about Christianity….There’s no sense to expect the fruits where the Word really is no longer being preached. But then what becomes of Christianity per se? The enlightened American, rather than viewing all this with skepticism, instead welcomes it as an example of progress. The fundamentalist sermon that occupies such a prominent place in the southern states has only one prominent Baptist representative in New York, one who preaches the resurrection of the flesh and the virgin birth before believers and the curious alike. In New York they preach about virtually everything; only one thing is not addressed, or is addressed so rarely that I have as yet been unable to hear it, namely, the gospel of Jesus Christ, the cross, sin and forgiveness, death and life. (Ibid., 106)

This situation has resulted in two pitfalls for the church. First, the church has become infested with false teaching and errant theology. Men have arisen in the spotlight preaching a false gospel that tickles the ears and have gone virtually unchallenged as they feed the self indulgent tendencies of mankind. Second, the congregants of the church have eroded their defense against false teaching by failing to be well versed in the truth. These two pitfalls have been the reef that many a ship of faith has wrecked upon. Pastors unconcerned with the diet of their sheep have produced sheep who care nothing of their diet. The watchmen of God’s flock have failed to keep watch and have allowed the wolves of false teaching into their pasture with the result of their anemic, defenseless sheep being devoured.

Born Out of Sunday School?

What is the root problem of the current situation? For years the church has implemented the Sunday School technique as a way to curb theological laziness and illiteracy but have the actual results matched the desired impact of the program?

Ken Ham in his book Already Gone explored this very question and found this: “Sunday School is actually more likely to be detrimental to the Spiritual and moral health of our children.” Perhaps this is due to the fact that Sunday School has not aimed to be as theologically accurate as it has aimed to provide an age appropriate story time. This is how Ken Ham described Sunday School.

In the hallways, the kids will split up by age and be welcomed into classrooms full of laughter and life and hope. Teachers will embrace these kids as if they are their own for about 45 minutes. They will pour their hearts and souls into the children and teens with the help of videos, various curricula resources, Bible stories, crayons, crackers, CD music, computer graphics, flannel graphs, white boards, cookies, cotton balls, popsicle sticks, prayers, and pipe cleaners…It all looks so safe and healthy – an inseparable part of the fabric of spiritual life in the western world. (Ken Ham and Britt Beemer, Already Gone, 37)

However, his findings completely demolished previously conceived ideas about the Sunday School program. According to his study, students who regularly attended Sunday School were more likely to: not believe that all the accounts/stories in the Bible are true/accurate, doubt the Bible because it was written by men, doubt the Bible because it was not translated correctly, defend that abortion should continue to be legal, defend premarital sex, accept that gay marriage and abortion should be legal, believe that God used evolution to change one kind of animal into another, view the church as hypocritical and believe that good people don’t need to go to church just to name a few. (Ibid., 39)

Conclusion

It would appear that the church’s effort to build the faith through Sunday School has not produced the desired result. In reflection upon my own experience with Sunday School, the accounts of Scripture were notoriously portrayed in a ‘fairy-tale’ manner rather than a Historical, Redemption fashion. As a result, when trials came later in life, the ‘fairy-tale’ approach left me with little to no foundation to fall upon and almost resulted in the shipwreck of faith. Indeed for some this lack of a proper foundation has resulted in just that.

Obviously, the Sunday School method is not the sole culprit to this condition. To look at this method alone and place the whole blame upon it is naive. It is a combination of factors that has led to this current situation, which will be addressed in later posts. Further, it is unwise to criticize a particular method without a plan to carry out in its place. Accordingly, in the following post (next Monday) we will cover the importance of theological knowledge and how methods certainly play a role in the success or failure thereof.

For now let it be said that I do believe that the Sunday School system needs an overhaul and in the coming weeks I will lay out an exact plan as to how this current mess we find ourselves in can be remedied. Perhaps it is time for the church to return to a historically proven method “forged through a kind of wisdom and life experience gained during an era in which Christians were less apt to simply react to the secular agenda and uncritically imitate its glitz, glamour and noise.” (Kim Riddlebarger, The Need to Recover the Practice of Catechism)

To read the Introduction to the Catechism series Click Here.

Cornelius Van Til and Belief in God

Cornelius Van Til

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Cornelius van Til was a Christian Philosopher, Presuppositional Apologist and Reformed Theologian born in Grootegast, The Netherlands, in 1895. If you are not familiar with him, I highly suggest reading his works such as The Defense of the Faith, A Christian Theory of Knowledge  or even his biography Cornelius Van Til: Reformed Apologist and Churchman. Further, Presuppositional Apologetics (also referred to as Reformed Apologetics) may seem very foreign to you, but it is the apologetic school that believes that Faith in God is the only basis for rational thought. This approach emphasizes the presentation of Christianity as revealed – based on the authoritative revelation of God in Scripture and in Jesus Christ. Its most common forms find absolute and certain proof of Christianity in the absolute and certain character of the knowledge that God has and that He has revealed to humanity. (For further reading about apologetic systems read Ken Boa and Robert Bowman’s Faith Has Its Reasons)

I recently read his pamphlet Why I Believe in God and was greatly encouraged by his sound defense of his believe in the existence of God. In his speech he not only accurate states the position of the non-believer, but also hints that Christians themselves have not done the best job preaching Christ. Here is what he says:

We were so anxious not to offend you that we offended our own God. But we dare no longer present our God to you as smaller or less exacting than He really is. He wants to be presented as the All-Conditioner, as the emplacement on which even those who deny Him must stand.

And again he says:

The fact that so many people are placed before a full exposition of the evidence for God’s existence and yet do not believe in Him has greatly discouraged us. We have therefore adopted measures of despair. Anxious to win your good will, we have again compromised our God. Noting the fact that men do not see, we have conceded that what they ought to see is hard to see. In our great concern to win men we have allowed that the evidence for God’s existence is only probably compelling. And from that fatal confession we have gone on step further down to the point where we have admitted or virtually admitted that it is not really compelling at all. And so we fall back upon our testimony instead of argument. After all, we say, God is not found at the end of an argument; He is found in our hearts. So we simply testify to men that once we were dead, and now we are alive, that once we were blind and that now we see, and give up all intellectual argument.

I highly encourage you to take some time to read through his argument Why I Believe in God and to evaluate your current efforts in ‘apologetics’. May we not be so conscious of not offending man that we lose sight of offending God. Do not be discouraged brothers and sisters. It is through the Bible that God speaks to those he has called. We are mere vessels for His use. May we seek to honor God and His word by setting forth to study it and speaking it in a logical manner in order that we may be ready to give an answer for the hope that lies within us. (1 Peter 3:15)

Why Catechism: An Introduction

1563's edition.

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What do Zion’s children know these days? How steeped are they in the solid joys and lasting treasure that rightfully belong to them as heirs of the kingdom? We may be saving up for their college or material inheritance, but are we passing on the inheritance of the faith? Do we greet the Lord’s Day as a gift of communion with the Triune God as we taste the powers of the age to come and soak up the water of life together with the saints? Do we use it as a day to be swept into the new creation, or as just another day on the calendar of this passing age? At a time when we’ve put so much emphasis on new programs, strategies, and techniques for spiritual and numerical growth, we need desperately to recover the neglected practice of catechesis in Christian homes and churches. – Michael Horton, “Trees or Tumbleweeds”, Modern Reformation Magazine, pg 12.

If you are like me and grew up in the church, you probably remember your Sunday School classes growing up. Further, upon recollection, you may notice that there was a tendency to paint the accounts of Scripture in a more ‘fairytale’ sort of fashion. Hence, when you grew up and entered your teen years and encountered life’s problems, the stories probably did little for you in the way of solidifying your faith at those times.

Today, the church in America faces a tremendous problem among its young people. Hordes of young people are leaving the church when they hit high school or college. The root of the issue is that they have not been properly brought up in the faith. Essentially, the church has failed to “Hold on to the pattern of sound teaching”, “commit to faithful men who will be able to teach others also”, and “contend for the faith that was delivered to the saints once for all.” (2 Timothy 1:13, 2:2; Jude 3)

Further, it appears that a minimalist approach has been taken towards the education of both new believers and children in the church. Rarely is the question asked “how much should I teach”, but rather “how little do I need to teach” is often the preferred question. All too often the retention of the happiness of members is emphasized to the detriment of diligent theological teaching. Not only do clergy give into this, but those in the pew as well. Quite often the attitude toward disciplined theological learning is one of disinterest or reluctance. They either believe it benefits them nothing in their everyday life (though nothing could be farther from the truth) or they believe that diligent theological education is out of their reach and only for ministers. Unfortunately this is not a new problem for the church. During his pastorate at Kidderminster in 17th Century England, Richard Baxter charged his congregation with this:

Were you but as willing to get the knowledge of God and heavenly things as you are to know how to work in your trade, you would have set yourself to it before this day, and you would have spared no cost or pains till you had got it. But you account seven years little enough to learn your trade, and will not bestow one day in seven in diligent learning the matters of your salvation.

It may be argued that it is natural to place so much time into learning a trade for by that trade you earn your living, while theological learning is beneficial to those who seek to make a living out it. Yet, theology is not a matter of making a living, it is a matter of God making dead men live. J.I. Packer pointed out the extreme importance of this when he wrote,

If we do not preach about sin and God’s judgment on it, we cannot present Christ as Saviour from sin and the wrath of God. And if we are silent about these things, and preach a Christ who saves only from self and the sorrows of this world, we are not preaching the Christ of the Bible. We are in effect bearing false witness and preaching a false Christ. Our message is ‘another gospel, which is not another’. Such preaching may soothe some, but it will help nobody; for a Christ who is not seen and sought as a Saviour from sin will not be found to save from self or from anything else. (pg 164, A Quest for Godliness by J.I. Packer)

It is of utmost importance that the Church begin passing on the faith that was once for all delivered to the saints. (Jude 1:3) We must not waste another moment to begin this great work. This is where the catechism comes into play. In conjunction with Scripture, a catechism sets to teaching doctrine in a Question and Answer format equipping the believer with not only the theological knowledge, but its Scriptural basis. These catechisms start with the condition of Man and move through Scripture to topics such as: God, Sin, Christ, Christ’s Atonement and the Church. Through repetition and diligent instruction catechism are often memorized and become a common basis of fellowship among believers.

I believe that the route of Catechesis is the surest route of succesful teaching of the Scriptures and Doctrine to children and new and old believers alike. With the catechism, there is no big production or heavy emphasis on entertainment which can be hindrances more than aids to teaching; it is the believer and their Bible communing with God and learning the particulars of their Salvation. I know that this word ‘catechism’ immediately brings the Roman Catholic Church to mind, but in the coming weeks I shall dispel that notion from your thinking. I am afraid that the church, having stepped away from a formal instruction in faith, has subjected generations of believers to a view of God and Scripture that is man centered and self-promoting because after all, it is all about ‘what Scripture says to you’.

For the next four weeks I will write a series of posts regarding this very topic and why it is vital to church stability and maturity. First we will cover the current theological laziness of the church. Second, I will write on the importance of doctrinal knowledge. Third, I will cover the language of the faith and its necessity to the Christian outside of pastoral ministry. Finally, I will cover samples of the Heidelberg catechism to demonstrate its depth and ease of use in the church.

Below you will find the three most common catechisms of the reformed faith. Take some time, read them over, and dwell on the simplicity of their structure yet the complexity which they teach. These will come of great use in the coming weeks.

The Heidelberg Catechism

The Westminster Larger Catechism

The Westminster Shorter Catechism

Aid Turned Hindrance?

Faith in some experience devoid of theological or biblical content–no matter how powerful–is not New Testament Christianity.  Those called to Christianity in general may believe nothing in particular. But faith resides in particulars. Some churches seem to think that doctrine is a concern for those of a certain intellectual bent, but unnecessary for most Christians.  Interest in doctrine amounts to something like an intellectual hobby.  Others steer clear of doctrine for fear of argument or division in the church.  Both factors indicate a lack of respect for the Christian believer and an abdication of the teaching function of the church.

– Albert Mohler –

I was recently sitting in a coffee shop when I picked up on a conversation between two women, presumably Christian due to the nature of their conversation. As the conversation progressed the topic moved towards Christian movies and how certain movies influenced them individually. I was astounded as they stated how certain concepts from the movies had shaped some of the ways they understood Scripture and how the movies had impacted their beliefs. What?

To be sure, media has enhanced ministry in the last twenty years. Never before has the church had the ability to spread the Gospel in such a rapid and effective manner as it enjoys today. Media has become an indispensable aid to the church; even to the point that mission agencies have sought ways in which to provide the same media material to missionaries and churches around the world. (i.e. Jesus: He Lived Among Us and The JESUS Film Project) What great tools have been afforded the church in our day!

However, have these aids become hindrances?

I have noticed a disturbing tendency in the church of America as of late in which Christians rely on slogans picked up from books and videos to form their theology rather than dedicating themselves to the earnest study of Scripture. As stated above by Albert Mohler, President of The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, many churches believe that the work of developing and studying theology is for certain intellectuals, such as the professor and pastor, but certainly not for the average Christian. This view of theology is detrimental because it falsely asserts that theology is a secondary aspect to the Christians walk and thereby believes that theology is not necessary for the ‘normal Christian walk’. What is missed in this assumption is that the Christian life cannot be lived without some form of theology driving it. Therefore when the theology behind their walk is not based on Scripture, other things will take its place. This proves detrimental because what comprises their theology is a melting pot of random existential experiences and insight from a myriad of authors who may or may not agree with one another.

This is where media comes into the argument. Media has vastly changed how Americans process information. Due to the sheer volume of media that people are exposed to in a given day, much of their thought processes are formed by tidbits of information rather than a complete, well thought-out argument. Anymore, communication is merely about what is said, rather than what is said and how it is said. As a result, we substitute how something is said with how it is interpreted by the hearer which leads to a plethora of various understandings. Finally, this reliance on tidbits of information in order to form our thoughts has resulted in lazy research. Many people no longer study for themselves. They leave the task of understanding and articulating complete arguments to the academic.

In the church, the problem is the same. The average Christian has no interest in theology or deep study of Scripture. Many arrive to church merely wanting the ‘take-away’ value and want little to do with the details of Scripture. As a result, churches use media as succinct ways to give the congregation brief theological insights and to spur deeper individual study. While this seemed like a good tactic since those in the congregation were accustomed to media, is appears that it has created a further problem. Many Christians rely on the short media presentations to form their theological beliefs.

Unfortunately, many within the industry that create these resources are not orthodox believers. Take for example The Passion of the Christ, which was a blockbuster for Christians and has been treasured by Christians around the world. What is totally overlooked by Christians is the fact that the film is infused with Roman Catholic Tradition, and many Christians now believe that some of the aspects of the film (i.e. Satan bearing a child, God shedding a tear, Judas being harassed by Demons, and Claudia providing linens to Mary the mother of Jesus to clean the blood from the scourging) are found in Scripture.

Christians have become incredibly lazy in their understanding of Scripture. We have settled for the path of least resistance and accepted all too easily what we find in ‘Christian’ Media. Many Christians have settled for the little pieces of information they receive, labeled biblical despite how unbiblical it may very well be, not realizing how detrimental and contradictory their ‘theological’ system has become. For this adoption, they pay a dear price in not understanding the Gospel they claim to believe as well as not being able to articulate that Gospel to those who ask. What tragedy has gripped the church and robbed it of precious understanding of its God and Gospel.

I pray that Christians will realize how they have crippled themselves and will seek to intimately know and understand God. Second, I pray that churches will begin to teach their congregations theology, not from a video or curriculum, but from Scripture alone. Third, I pray that Christians will learn the Gospel in order that they can provide an answer for the hope that lies within them. Finally, I pray that Christians will begin to carry out discernment when deciding what media to absorb because the mere title ‘Christian’ defines so little anymore.

So what about you? Do you turn to Scripture when trying to understand theology, or have you relied upon what Hollywood and publishing houses have produced? Can you articulate the Gospel you claim to cling to? Has your Christian walk become a melting pot of conflicting ideas and opinions not derived from Scripture?

What will you do to change?

“For though by this time you ought to be teachers, you need someone to teach you again the basic principles of God’s revelation. You need milk, not solid food. Now everyone who lives on milk is inexperienced with the message about righteousness, because he is an infant. But solid food is for the mature – for those whose sense have been trained to distinguish between good and evil. Therefore, leaving the elementary message about the Messiah, let us go on to maturity, not laying again the foundation of repentance from dead works, faith in God, teaching about ritual washings, laying on of hands, the resurrection of the dead, and eternal judgment.”

– Hebrews 5:12-6:2 –

“There is no theology here…”

I have been reading a new biography on Dietrich Bonhoeffer, which has been a delightful read, but I was particularly interested in several of Dietrich’s comments regarding American Seminaries during 1930-31. Bonhoeffer’s time in America greatly shaped the rest of his ministry upon his return to Germany. In America, he acquired four friends that influenced and challenged him, but it was also the place where he first encountered the racism he would later see in Germany. I would like to at this time quote several things that he said in regards to American Seminaries. NOTE: ALL quotes by Dietrich Bonhoeffer below are from Bonhoeffer: Pastor, Martyr, Prophet, Spy by Eric Metaxas, (Nashville, Thomas Nelson, 2010).

There is no theology here…They talk a blue streak without the slightest substantive foundation and with no evidence of any criteria. The students – on the average twenty-five to thirty years old – are completely clueless with respect to what dogmatics is really about. They are unfamiliar with even the most basic questions. They become intoxicated with liberal and humanistic phrases, laugh at the fundamentalists, and yet basically are not even up to their level. (pg 101)

This is characteristics of all American thought, particularly as I have observed it in theology and the church; they do not see the radical claim of truth on the sharpening of their lives. Community is therefore founded less on truth than on the spirit of “fairness.” (pg 104)

The lack of seriousness with which the students here speak of God and the world is, to say the least, extremely surprising….Over here one can hardly imagine the innocence with which people on the brink of their ministry, or some of them already in it, ask questions in the seminar for practical theology – for example, whether one should really preach of Christ. In the end, with some idealism and a bit of cunning, we will be finished even with this – that is their sort of mood. The theological atmosphere of the Union Theological Seminary is accelerating the process of the secularization of Christianity in America. Its criticism is directed essentially against the fundamentalists and to a certain extent also against the radical humanists in Chicago; it is healthy and necessary. But there is no sound basis on which one can rebuild after demolition. It is carried away with the general collapse. A seminary in which it can come about that a large number of students laugh out loud in a public lecture at the quoting of a passage from Luther’s De sevo arbitrio on sin and forgiveness because it seems to them to be comic has evidently completely forgotten what Christian theology by its very nature stands for. (pg 105)

I am particularly struck by Bonhoeffer’s comments because I don’t think much has changed since then. Most of our ‘Christian’ Universities are more of a vocation school rather than seminaries. The vast majority of Christians are more concerned with figuring out a way to make a living for themselves, than learning and studying the faith they adhere to in order that the truth of the Gospel can correctly impact their lives and in addition, assist them in detecting false teaching. Scholarship has greatly decreased among Christians and as a result, we cannot adequately articulate or defend what we believe, nor can we spot the false teaching that is running rampant throughout the church today.

Sadly though, Christians have greatly departed from the path of critical thinking. An example of this comes yet again from the biography. I have learned that Dietrich Bonhoeffer, while being educated in Germany, attended the classes of professors that he did not agree with, yet it did not change his thinking. Going into the course, he knew what he believed and was able to respectfully stand against any errors that came his way. This is an exercise that Christians on whole are lacking incredibly.

How long must the Church lie in ignorance? Ignorance is killing us because we don’t know what we believe, why we believe it, and the result therefore is that we cannot properly live it out. Essentially, the truth we claim to hold to has had no effect on our lives because we do no even know what the truth is!

It is important to realize though that you do not have to be an academic professor or have a PhD. in order to be able to becoming literate in your faith. All you really need to do is apply yourself to studying the Scriptures and find some great resources in order to aid and teach you. (Hence I have a recommended reading page and a ‘Trustworthy Resources’ tab of links) So quit sitting on the sideline and begin by knowing what you believe, why you believe it, be able to defend it, and apply it to your life.

The Challenge of Pluralism

“The challenge of pluralism in our country is so prevailing. What pluralism says is that all of these views are equally valid, because everybody is really on about the same thing. But when they are honest about Jesus, they know that Jesus is not like Buddha, and he isn’t like Krishna, and he isn’t like the religious leaders that have walked across the stage of time. He is radically different. So in order to maintain the perspective of philosophical pluralism, the pluralist must then devalue Jesus. That is why in Time, Newsweek, and all these magazines, there is a constant onslaught on the Deity of Christ, on the significance of the Death of Christ, and of the notion of the return of Christ. Why? Because these things stick out like a sore thumb. His very claims are so unbelievable, and the dramatic transformation in these disciples is undeniable, and the existence of an ever expanding church is inescapable! So if they are going to convince us that we are all the same, then they will either have to bring the other characters up to the level of Jesus, or do what they do, and that is seek to bring Jesus down to the level of the other characters.”

– Alistair Begg